Stative Verbs List – Post 12


ATTENTION PLEASE: if you are not reading this article in English, I highly recommend that you turn off the automatic translation on your browser. 


Stative verbs are verbs that you will not conjugate in the progressive tenses because they inherently express quiescence rather than movement.

Here is a rather complete list of common English Stative Verbs:

adore

agree

appear

appreciate

astonish

be

believe

belong

care for

concern

consist

contain

cost

deny

depend

deserve

desire

disagree

dislike

doubt

feel ( = have an opinion )

fit

forget

hate

have ( = possess )

hear

hope

hurt

imagine

impress

include

involve

itch

know

lack

like

look ( = seem )

love

matter

mean

measure ( = have length, etc. )

mind

need

owe

own

please

possess

prefer

promise

realize (= be/become aware)

recognize

remember

satisfy

see

seem

smell (To notice or recognize a particular smell)

sound 

Stand ( = bear “I can’t stand him.” dislike somebody/something)

suit 

suppose

surprise

taste

think ( = have an opinion )

understand

value

want

weigh ( = have weight )

wish

Note: Many of those verbs may be both stative or action verbs depending on the context.

This is a rather complete list of common English Stative Verbs, you don’t need to memorize all of them out of context, they will become familiar to you through practice. Take that list as a reference. You can consult it whenever you want.


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“Somebody did something” – Past Simple – Post 9


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Last week, I took the B2 exam.” – You should use the Past Simple when speaking about a completed action which took place in a specified time in the past.

Yesterday, I listened to a very interesting radio program.”

When I was young, I loved sweets.”

If you are talking about the past, and the time of the discourse is already known, you don’t need to specify it:

Last summer, we took a wonderful trip. We went to America and Asia. It took us an entire month to complete the journey.” – All three sentences express completed actions which took place last summer. So, we don’t need to point it out in each sentence.


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“Somebody has just done something” – Present perfect 2 – “Have just done” – Post 8


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Normally, the Present Perfect is used to express non-completed actions or completed actions that you may repeat in the future. However, there are exceptions.

In the following case the Present Perfect expresses a completed action which has happened recently and you can use “just” in order to emphasize that concept:

Q: “Are you having breakfast with us today?”

A: “No thanks, I’ve just had it.”


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“Somebody has done something” – Present Perfect 1 – “Have done” – Post 7


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I have visited France four times.” – That means that I have been to France four times during my entire life until now, and that there is the possibility that I go to France more times in the future.

The present perfect indicates that you have done something during a period of time, and that you may continue doing such thing.

“I have had three fruit infusions today.” (Present Perfect)- You would say that if it is 12 a.m. because you may have more fruit infusions throughout the rest of the day, maybe in the evening. But if the day is over and you are in bed, then you should say “I had three fruit infusions today.” (Past Simple)


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“It was a (very) long time since somebody did something” – Past Simple – Post 3


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This particular expression is used when talking about the past to express that something happened prior to the time we are describing, and emphasizes that much time passed between the event and the time we are talking about.

Example: “It was a long time since he drove a car, yet he did it very well.”


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“It has been a (very) long time since” – Present Perfect – Post 2


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“It has been a (very) long time since somebody did something.” – This form means that somebody did something in the past, and you are emphasizing that much time has passed since that particular thing happened.

Example: “What a surprise to see you, Mark! It has been a very long time (since we met).”


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“I used to do something” vs “I am used to doing something” – Post 1


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We use “I used to do something” when speaking about the past, in order to express that we did something on a regular basis, but we don’t do it any more.

For example: When I was young, I used to cycle every day.


We use “I’m used to doing something” to say that we do something on a regular basis in the present.


For example: I’m used to cycling every day. (meaning that I do it on a regular basis, in the present.)


Note 1: In the form “I used to do something”, “used to” is a modal verb; whereas in the form “I’m used to doing something” the cell “used to” is an adjective.


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